pic1 immigration pic2 Picture1 pic3 Picture3
  • MEET
  • News
  • Lowest specialised care and increased use of emergency services among the immigrant population in Spain.

Lowest specialised care and increased use of emergency services among the immigrant population in Spain.

A study carried out by the Biomedical Research Centre Network reveals health differences between immigrant and native population in Spain. This is a review of scientific papers held by their Sub programme in Immigration and Health, on health, epidemiology and health services use by the immigrant population in Spain.

The review indicates that young women immigrants are at greater risk for mental health problems. Among other findings, this study also highlights, compared with natives, greater exposure to worst material and psychosocial conditions that affect health, worse perceived health and quality of life are at increased residence time, the increased prevalence of obesity and less practical exercise, the greater violence, and lower overall mortality. The participation of immigrants in prevention programs is lower; moreover, they use less specialised care and emergency services. As for infectious diseases, the study highlights the increased prevalence of hepatitis B and C among migrants; the increased risk of ‘parasitosis’ and mycosis imported during the first year of residence, and later in traveling to their place of origin; the highest incidence of tuberculosis in young and adult multiresistant tuberculosis; the high proportion of immigrants, about 40% in newly diagnosed HIV infection, the high prevalence of HIV infection, as well as some STIs, and resistance to anti-retroviral treatment in certain immigrant groups. Methodologically, a small number of longitudinal studies and case-control was found.

For more information click here.

 

FacebookTwitterGoogle Bookmarks